Grenfell Tower – Council could be tried for Corporate Manslaughter

There are “reasonable grounds” to suspect Kensington Borough Council is guilty of corporate manslaughter for its role in the death of at least 80 people after the Grenfell Tower fire, Scotland Yard has revealed.

There are “reasonable grounds” to suspect Kensington Borough Council is guilty of corporate manslaughter for its role in the death of at least 80 people after the Grenfell Tower fire, Scotland Yard has revealed.

In a letter to survivors and families of victims of the blaze, the police said that the authority and the Kensington and Chelsea Tenant Management Organisation (KCTMO) could be guilty of the serious charges.

“After an initial assessment of that information, the officer leading the investigation has today notified Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea and the KCTMO that there are reasonable grounds to suspect that each organisation may have committed the offence of corporate manslaughter, under the Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act 2007,” the letter read.

Read full article here – http://www.publicsectorexecutive.com/Public-Sector-News/council-could-be-tried-for-corporate-manslaughter-after-grenfell-fire?lipi=urn%3Ali%3Apage%3Ad_flagship3_search_srp_content%3BTaMkaAp7SXaK2B4p5AJoQw%3D%3D

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